Monsoon Season in Arizona Means Palo Verde Beetles

From June to September, the residents of Arizona experience the catch-22 known as monsoon season. The wind and rain from monsoons can be a refreshing change from the heat and dryness that Arizona residents deal with throughout the year. But as any Phoenix pest control specialist will tell you, the monsoons bring out unwanted pests that can cause a long list of problems for residents and their properties.

The Palo Verde Beetle is again making its debut this monsoon season all over Maricopa County. Many people mistake it for being a large roach or something from one of your worst nightmares! They are the most active during the early evening hours. This scary looking beetle emerges from their home to mate and lay eggs in tree roots then immediately go off and die. They are harmless but are usually the size of the palm of your hand and, YES- they will fly!

If you've been in Arizona long enough, you've no doubt seen them. But new residents and visitors often mistake the Palo Verde beetle for a flying roach or critter that crawled out of their darkest nightmares. They're often photographed next to a hand, doorknob or set of keys, just to show off their unfortunate size.

After spending years chomping on trees, all these buggers need is love.

Adult Palo Verde beetles eat nectar and fruit, so they're harmless to other insects as well. And that's if they even have an appetite at all.

If you see one, just sweep it away - or run away screaming like most people would do.

Hence their name. These beetles have a long gestation period that lasts about 12 to 24 months. If Arizona residents live by Palo Verde trees or have them in their yards, they’re more likely to see these bugs. And the older the tree, the more likely a Palo Verde beetle lives there.

Arizona keeps giving us more reasons to "love" monsoon storms. The summertime moisture from the state's characteristic weather phenomenons coaxes Palo Verde beetles out of their home. It's why they appear each year around this time. So watch your step when you're walking around the parks and pools.